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FOTOGALLERY | Siria, l’orrore della guerra nei volti dei bambini

Solo nel 2018, in Siria 1.106 bambini sono stati uccisi nei combattimenti, il più alto numero di bambini uccisi in un solo anno dall'inizio della guerra.
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On 26 January 2019 in the Syrian Arab Republic, children and families are huddled together after being forced to flee their homes in nearby towns and villages, with their few belongings in Baghoz village in Hajin district in eastern rural Deir-ez-Zor before they embark on a long and ardous journey to safety at Al-Hol camp, almost 300km to the north.  On 26 January 2019 in the Syrian Arab Republic, after being forced to flee their homes in nearby towns and villages, children and families are huddled together with few belongings in Baghoz village in Hajin district in eastern rural Deir-ez-Zor, before they embark on a long and ardous journey to safety at Al-Hol camp, almost 300km to the north.  In the past three days alone, over 5,000 people have arrived at the camp from Hajin, bringing the number to around 23,000. Families arrive extremely exhausted after a three-day journey in harsh desert winter conditions with little food and shelter along the way.  UNICEF is on the ground at the camp and in screening centres, providing children and families with much-needed healthcare services, including basic treatment, malnutrition screening, and referral to hospitals when needed. UNICEF has also provided 500 heaters, 7,000 winter clothing kits and 10,000 thermal blankets to children and families and is providing ongoing tracking and family reunification support to unaccompanied and separated children at the camp.
In late January 2019 in the Syrian Arab Republic, escalating violence since December 2018 has forced thousands of people out of their homes in towns and villages in Hajin district in eastern rural Deir-ez-Zor. Families embarked on a long and arduous journey to safety at Al-Hol camp for internally displaced people, almost 300km to the north. In the past three days alone, over 5,000 people have arrived at the camp from Hajin, bringing the number to around 23,000. Lack of security has made humanitarian access to children en route to the camp’s screening area all but
On 26 January 2019 in the Syrian Arab Republic, children and families are huddled together after being forced to flee their homes in nearby towns and villages, with their few belongings in Baghoz village in Hajin district in eastern rural Deir-ez-Zor before they embark on a long and ardous journey to safety at Al-Hol camp, almost 300km to the north.  On 26 January 2019 in the Syrian Arab Republic, after being forced to flee their homes in nearby towns and villages, children and families are huddled together with few belongings in Baghoz village in Hajin district in eastern rural Deir-ez-Zor, before they embark on a long and ardous journey to safety at Al-Hol camp, almost 300km to the north.  In the past three days alone, over 5,000 people have arrived at the camp from Hajin, bringing the number to around 23,000. Families arrive extremely exhausted after a three-day journey in harsh desert winter conditions with little food and shelter along the way.  UNICEF is on the ground at the camp and in screening centres, providing children and families with much-needed healthcare services, including basic treatment, malnutrition screening, and referral to hospitals when needed. UNICEF has also provided 500 heaters, 7,000 winter clothing kits and 10,000 thermal blankets to children and families and is providing ongoing tracking and family reunification support to unaccompanied and separated children at the camp.
In late January 2019 in the Syrian Arab Republic, escalating violence since December 2018 has forced thousands of people out of their homes in towns and villages in Hajin district in eastern rural Deir-ez-Zor. Families embarked on a long and arduous journey to safety at Al-Hol camp for internally displaced people, almost 300km to the north. In the past three days alone, over 5,000 people have arrived at the camp from Hajin, bringing the number to around 23,000. Lack of security has made humanitarian access to children en route to the camp’s screening area all but
On 26 January 2019 in the Syrian Arab Republic, children and families are huddled together after being forced to flee their homes in nearby towns and villages, with their few belongings in Baghoz village in Hajin district in eastern rural Deir-ez-Zor before they embark on a long and ardous journey to safety at Al-Hol camp, almost 300km to the north.  On 26 January 2019 in the Syrian Arab Republic, after being forced to flee their homes in nearby towns and villages, children and families are huddled together with few belongings in Baghoz village in Hajin district in eastern rural Deir-ez-Zor, before they embark on a long and ardous journey to safety at Al-Hol camp, almost 300km to the north.  In the past three days alone, over 5,000 people have arrived at the camp from Hajin, bringing the number to around 23,000. Families arrive extremely exhausted after a three-day journey in harsh desert winter conditions with little food and shelter along the way.  UNICEF is on the ground at the camp and in screening centres, providing children and families with much-needed healthcare services, including basic treatment, malnutrition screening, and referral to hospitals when needed. UNICEF has also provided 500 heaters, 7,000 winter clothing kits and 10,000 thermal blankets to children and families and is providing ongoing tracking and family reunification support to unaccompanied and separated children at the camp.
In late January 2019 in the Syrian Arab Republic, escalating violence since December 2018 has forced thousands of people out of their homes in towns and villages in Hajin district in eastern rural Deir-ez-Zor. Families embarked on a long and arduous journey to safety at Al-Hol camp for internally displaced people, almost 300km to the north. In the past three days alone, over 5,000 people have arrived at the camp from Hajin, bringing the number to around 23,000. Lack of security has made humanitarian access to children en route to the camp’s screening area all but
On 26 January 2019 in the Syrian Arab Republic, children and families are huddled together after being forced to flee their homes in nearby towns and villages, with their few belongings in Baghoz village in Hajin district in eastern rural Deir-ez-Zor before they embark on a long and ardous journey to safety at Al-Hol camp, almost 300km to the north.  On 26 January 2019 in the Syrian Arab Republic, after being forced to flee their homes in nearby towns and villages, children and families are huddled together with few belongings in Baghoz village in Hajin district in eastern rural Deir-ez-Zor, before they embark on a long and ardous journey to safety at Al-Hol camp, almost 300km to the north.  In the past three days alone, over 5,000 people have arrived at the camp from Hajin, bringing the number to around 23,000. Families arrive extremely exhausted after a three-day journey in harsh desert winter conditions with little food and shelter along the way.  UNICEF is on the ground at the camp and in screening centres, providing children and families with much-needed healthcare services, including basic treatment, malnutrition screening, and referral to hospitals when needed. UNICEF has also provided 500 heaters, 7,000 winter clothing kits and 10,000 thermal blankets to children and families and is providing ongoing tracking and family reunification support to unaccompanied and separated children at the camp.
In late January 2019 in the Syrian Arab Republic, escalating violence since December 2018 has forced thousands of people out of their homes in towns and villages in Hajin district in eastern rural Deir-ez-Zor. Families embarked on a long and arduous journey to safety at Al-Hol camp for internally displaced people, almost 300km to the north. In the past three days alone, over 5,000 people have arrived at the camp from Hajin, bringing the number to around 23,000. Lack of security has made humanitarian access to children en route to the camp’s screening area all but
On 26 January 2019 in the Syrian Arab Republic, children and families are huddled together after being forced to flee their homes in nearby towns and villages, with their few belongings in Baghoz village in Hajin district in eastern rural Deir-ez-Zor before they embark on a long and ardous journey to safety at Al-Hol camp, almost 300km to the north.  On 26 January 2019 in the Syrian Arab Republic, after being forced to flee their homes in nearby towns and villages, children and families are huddled together with few belongings in Baghoz village in Hajin district in eastern rural Deir-ez-Zor, before they embark on a long and ardous journey to safety at Al-Hol camp, almost 300km to the north.  In the past three days alone, over 5,000 people have arrived at the camp from Hajin, bringing the number to around 23,000. Families arrive extremely exhausted after a three-day journey in harsh desert winter conditions with little food and shelter along the way.  UNICEF is on the ground at the camp and in screening centres, providing children and families with much-needed healthcare services, including basic treatment, malnutrition screening, and referral to hospitals when needed. UNICEF has also provided 500 heaters, 7,000 winter clothing kits and 10,000 thermal blankets to children and families and is providing ongoing tracking and family reunification support to unaccompanied and separated children at the camp.
In late January 2019 in the Syrian Arab Republic, escalating violence since December 2018 has forced thousands of people out of their homes in towns and villages in Hajin district in eastern rural Deir-ez-Zor. Families embarked on a long and arduous journey to safety at Al-Hol camp for internally displaced people, almost 300km to the north. In the past three days alone, over 5,000 people have arrived at the camp from Hajin, bringing the number to around 23,000. Lack of security has made humanitarian access to children en route to the camp’s screening area all but
Ahmad, 12, carries supplies through Areesheh, a northeastern tented camp for Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), Al-Hasakah  Governorate, Syrian Arab Republic, 15 November 2018. Originally from Homs, Ahmad has been displaced several times over the past few years, finally reaching Areesheh camp last year. “We need a new tent to protect us from the rain and fuel for heating,” he says of his family's situation. For the 13,000 people who currently live in Areesheh, in the middle of the desert, winter comes with added harshness. Having fled escalating violence over the past two years with few belongings, these children and their families are living in basic conditions, lacking warm clothes, blankets or heating.
On 16 January 2019 in the Syrian Arab Republic, twins Hasnaa and Hawraa are 9 months old. Together with their mother and two siblings, they fled violence in Susa village in Hajin sub-district of Deir-ez-Zor governorate, northeastern Syria.  The family made an arduous journey to Al-Hol camp around two weeks ago. “We were forced to displace a few times, but this time was the worst. I walked for 100 km, carrying my twins and watching over my other children,” says their mother, Halima.
In February 2019 in the Syrian Arab Republic, despite a reported respite in violence in southeast Deir-ez-Zor, hundreds of families continue to flee to Al-Hol camp, around 300 kilometers to the north. Having lived without basic services for years and made the arduous journey to the camp, vulnerable children are in even more danger. The tented camp now hosts almost 50,000 internally displaced people, well beyond its capacity.  UNICEF is supporting four mobile health teams of doctors and nurses, as well as a fixed clinic, working around the clock in the camp and reception centers to provide children and mothers with much-needed healthcare services. The teams are screening children for malnutrition and common illnesses, providing necessary nutritional supplements and referring cases to hospitals in Hassakeh. More than 87 children are currently receiving treatment for severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and another 440 for moderate acute malnutrition (MAM).  UNICEF also supports families at Al-Hol through the provision of safe drinking water, the establishment of latrines, shower units and water tanks, the distribution of hygiene items and winter clothes for children and the establishment of child and adolescent friendly spaces and self-learning centres.
On 16 January 2019 in the Syrian Arab Republic, 17-months old Yaqoob cried during a malnutrition screening at the UNICEF-supported clinic at Al-Hol camp. Yaqoob arrived in Al-Hol camp last month, severely malnourished. The UNICEF-supported mobile health team, in coordination with WHO, referred him to a hospital in Hassakeh where he underwent treatment and close follow-up.  Yaqoob and his family were displaced from Iraw into Hajin in Deir-ez-Zor years ago. With recent escalating violence, they fled to Al-Hol camp. During the arduous journey, his mother gave birth to a baby girl.  “For 10 days we had no food or water,” says his mother who had to give birth without access to health professionals.
In February 2019 in the Syrian Arab Republic, despite a reported respite in violence in southeast Deir-ez-Zor, hundreds of families continue to flee to Al-Hol camp, around 300 kilometers to the north. Having lived without basic services for years and made the arduous journey to the camp, vulnerable children are in even more danger. The tented camp now hosts almost 50,000 internally displaced people, well beyond its capacity.  UNICEF is supporting four mobile health teams of doctors and nurses, as well as a fixed clinic, working around the clock in the camp and reception centers to provide children and mothers with much-needed healthcare services. The teams are screening children for malnutrition and common illnesses, providing necessary nutritional supplements and referring cases to hospitals in Hassakeh. More than 87 children are currently receiving treatment for severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and another 440 for moderate acute malnutrition (MAM).  UNICEF also supports families at Al-Hol through the provision of safe drinking water, the establishment of latrines, shower units and water tanks, the distribution of hygiene items and winter clothes for children and the establishment of child and adolescent friendly spaces and self-learning centres.

SIRIA/UNICEF: NEL 2018 1.106 BAMBINI UCCISI, NUMERO PIÙ ALTO DA INIZIO GUERRA

ROMA – “Solo nel 2018, in Siria 1.106 bambini sono stati uccisi nei combattimenti, il più alto numero di bambini uccisi in un solo anno dall’inizio della guerra. Questi sono solo i numeri che l’Onu è stato in grado di verificare, ma le cifre reali sono probabilmente molto più alte. Le mine rappresentano ora la principale causa di vittime tra i bambini in tutto il paese, con 434 morti e feriti causati da ordigni inesplosi l’anno scorso. Il 2018 ha visto anche 262 attacchi contro le strutture scolastiche e sanitarie, anch’essi a livelli record.

Oggi c’è un allarmante equivoco che il conflitto in Siria stia rapidamente per concludersi: non è così. I bambini in alcune parti del paese rimangono in pericolo come in qualsiasi altro momento durante gli otto anni di conflitto. Sono particolarmente preoccupata per la situazione nella Siria nordoccidentale di Idlibin, dove un’intensificazione della violenza ha ucciso 59 bambini solo nelle ultime settimane.

I bambini e le famiglie nelle terre di nessuno continuano a vivere nel limbo. La situazione delle famiglie di Rukban, vicino al confine giordano, continua ad essere disperata, con accesso limitato a cibo, acqua, riparo, assistenza sanitaria e istruzione. Sono anche allarmata dal peggioramento delle condizioni del campo di Al Hol, nel nord-est del paese, dove vivono più di 65.000 persone, tra cui si stima che ci siano 240 bambini non accompagnati o separati. Da gennaio di quest’anno, quasi 60 bambini sono morti lungo i 300 chilometri di cammino da Baghouz al campo. Il destino dei bambini dei ‘foreign fighters’ in Siria rimane poco chiaro. L’UNICEF esorta gli Stati membri ad assumersi la responsabilità per i bambini che sono loro cittadini o nati da loro cittadini, e ad adottare misure per evitare che i bambini diventino apolidi.

Nel frattempo, i paesi limitrofi della regione ospitano 2,6 milioni di bambini rifugiati siriani che, nonostante il sostegno dei governi ospitanti, delle Nazioni Unite e della comunità internazionale, devono affrontare le proprie sfide. Molte famiglie non possono mandare i propri figli a scuola e, con poche opportunità di guadagno, stanno scegliendo soluzioni negative tra cui il lavoro minorile e il matrimonio infantile per farcela.

All’inizio del nono anno di guerra, l’UNICEF ricorda ancora una volta alle parti in conflitto e alla comunità globale che sono i bambini che hanno sofferto di più e che hanno più da perdere. Ogni giorno in cui il conflitto continua è un altro giorno rubato alla loro infanzia.

L’UNICEF continua a lavorare in tutta la Siria e nei paesi vicini per aiutare a fornire ai bambini servizi sanitari, educativi, di protezione e nutrizionali essenziali e per aiutare a costruire la capacità di recupero delle famiglie. Ma questo non è sufficiente. Rinnoviamo il nostro appello a tutte le parti in conflitto, così come a coloro che hanno influenza su di loro, a dare priorità alla protezione di tutti i bambini, indipendentemente da chi controlla quale area e a prescindere dalle presunte affiliazioni di un bambino ad una famiglia.

Rinnoviamo anche il nostro appello per un accesso incondizionato e sicuro alle famiglie bisognose e per soluzioni sostenibili, volontarie e a lungo termine per coloro che scelgono di non tornare. Alla vigilia della conferenza dei donatori a Bruxelles, esortiamo anche i donatori a mantenere la loro generosità nei confronti dei bambini della Siria e dei paesi vicini. Sono necessari finanziamenti prevedibili, senza restrizioni e pluriennali per far fronte ai bisogni immediati e a lungo termine dei bambini e delle loro famiglie in Siria e in tutta la regione”.

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